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The Gilmore Gold Project

The Gilmore Project is 100% owned by Comet Resources Ltd. The exploration licence EL8282 covers 90 Square Kilometres located 80km west of Canberra in New South Wales.

Map of Gilmore Project

 

 

Mineralisation Targets

The Gilmore Gold Project is an attractive target for gold and base metal mineralisation due to the presence of a Silurian volcano-sedimentary sequence, located close to a major regional thrust fault zone known as the Gilmore Suture.

 

Widespread gold and base metal geochemical responses within the Project area also illuminate the potential for successful exploration.

Gilmore Gold Project

 

 

The Gilmore Suture

The Gilmore Suture is a controlling focus for major gold deposits including Sovereign Gold Ltd.’s Mount Adrah (located approximately 30kms away along the Gilmore Suture), Adelong, Temora, Gidginbung, West Wyalong, Lake Cowal, and Mineral Hill. Earlier exploration has given widespread gold and base metal geochemical responses associated with high strain zones, and interpreted sub-surface intrusives.

 

Gilmore Project Gold Bearing Rock

 

Exploration Focus

Exploration is currently focused on the Main Ridge North Prospect, where rock chip traverse sampling successfully highlighted an area of anomalous gold mineralisation with associated Mo+Bi+Sb±Ag±Pb anomalies. Gold assays recorded at Main Ridge North indicate an anomalies gold zone over 800 metres of strike. The geochemical signature may be indicative of a proximal style of intrusive related gold system (IRGS). 

 

 

Magnetic Inversion

 

Magnetics

The Main Ridge North Prospect also features a shallow magnetic intrusion, which was highlighted by 3D UBC magnetic inversion modelling performed by Southern Geoscience Consultants (SGC).  

 

This intrusion has subsequently been the subject of 2D magnetic forward modelling.  SGC have also completed an aeromagnetic interpretation of the Gilmore Project area, highlighting structural elements and other possible intrusions.

 

 

 

 

 

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